Charitable Giving Opportunities for Investors Part 1 of 4

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When choosing the most advantageous charitable giving strategy, individuals must evaluate a number of factors, such as their need for current income, their desire to control and preserve assets during life and after death, their specific charitable intent, as well as important tax management issues. Charitable estate planning techniques can help achieve many of these objectives. Donor-advised funds, family foundations, and charitable remainder trusts (CRTs)/charitable lead trusts (CLTs) are available to individuals and their families.

Donor-Advised Funds

A donor-advised fund is a tax-advantaged charitable giving vehicle that offers maximum flexibility to take tax deductions and recommend grants to charitable organizations. By definition, donor-advised funds are public charities under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, and contributions to such funds are tax deductible.

Donor-advised funds are particularly family-friendly, as parents and children can consolidate their giving activities through a single fund account. In addition, children can be named as successors to a fund, ensuring the continuation of a family’s giving legacy.

Another significant advantage of a donor-advised fund is its capacity to accept any one of a variety of assets as a charitable contribution. Checks/wire transfers, commercial paper, mutual fund shares, securities, bonds, and restricted stocks all are acceptable assets.1 In addition, the account has the potential to grow over time, increasing the donor’s giving power.

Cole Strickland, MBA
cole.strickland@lpl.com http://www.lpl.com
© 2012 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

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